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recycled tires for raised beds?

Can I use old tires for raised beds or are there chemicals in them that can leech into the soil?
 
Please don't think people are ignoring you. I've heard strong opinions both ways. I've seen studies both ways. That being the case, I don't feel that I can answer your question. I just noticed that you haven't gotten an answer & didn't want you to feel like you were being ignored. More people watch the Over the Fence forum. Maybe you'd get an answer there.
I can tell you that I don't use them for growing areas. I do plan to use them (filled w/ cement) to hold fence posts in areas of the farm that are so wet the fence posts won't stay w/ just the post pounded into the ground. I am also planning on using them (again filled w/ cement) to hold down fencing where neighbor dogs are coming in under the fence to hunt the lambs/kids, and where the driveway washes out. But, I won't grow anything in them, just in case the chems would leak. I'd rather let other people find out if it's safe for me.
Confused
Good luck w/ your garden!
 
Planning to be a Cancer survivor!!! No trees were killed or animals harmed in the sending of this message; however a great many electrons were horribly inconvenienced.
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Personally I don't use tires for my raised beds, but I would happily eat anything grown by others I know who do.

Here's two ways I've seen them used:

You can cut the bead off with a sawzall and then turn them inside out (which takes three men and a boy...), and they will stand up about a foot tall, making a nice circular raised bed.

Another thing people do is cut off the sidewalls and make one cut through the tread. This makes for a strip 6-8 inches tall and about 8 feet long that makes a reasonably good side wall for a raised bed. You support the sides with pegs cut from rebar, or you can drive some stakes into the ground and screw the tire tred to the stakes to form the bed. The black rubber sides certainly will help the beds warm up in the spring and stay warm in the fall.

Some people are concerned that the tires will leach materials into the soil that may be harmful. I don't know about that. I calculate that the produce from my garden is substantially better and purer than what I can readily buy, even if there are chemicals picked up from my hoses, drippers, freezer containers, etc.

Given the cost of buying/building beds from other materials, I think rubber tire "lumber" may be a pretty good deal.
 
[i]Mulch where you can Till if you have to Weed when you must It's all part of the plan[/i].
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My assumption is that it would take some time for them to breakdown and leach chemicals. I plan to use tractor tires for the growing of potatoes for my own use next year. That is if I can get a few (3-6 for 3 circles). Those 'Potato Towers' are ridiculously expensive!
 

 

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Small market and CSA grower. 1/2 acre. Doing too much by myself but trying. http://www.localharvest.org/member/M33044

Central Minnesota Zone 4

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I used old car tires about 30 years ago for growing my potatoes and it worked very well indeed.

I don't now how safe it was but I am still alive and in good health. But then that was a long time ago and I only did it for a few years and then we moved.
 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ LAUS DEO, Where ever I go, there I am. ..... major at nwi dot net ..... Zone 6a, Eastern Washington, sagebrush high desert, Columbia plateau.
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I use old tires for flower planters. Had radishes in one last year before teh flowers grew tall. Since they are filled with totally organic matter, I don't worry too much about chemical leaching. I suppose there may be some chemicals in there, but I'm willing to risk it. I've used old tractor tires for raised beds before. Like Major says, I'm still alive.
 

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Bloom where you are planted.

Zone 4 Central South Dakota

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Tires DO break down over time. So I suppose sometging will leach out of them.

If I have an objection to tires as raised beds it is an esthetic one. For me a plain old tree trunk laid at the edge of a bed looks more better.

But thats just me.
 
[hr]Beyond the mountains, there are more mountains.
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Dont you think that this will some how can create some toxic effect out of it??I think this can cause the abrupt chemicals go inside into the soil after decomposition and could case some defect in the bed forfation!!!
 
http://www.organicconservative.com
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