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Starting greenhouse in zone 7 (Pacific Northwest)

Hi, everybody.
I am not a new gardener but i am a new greenhouse gardener.
Wondering if there are some gardeners from zone 7 that have experience with greenhouses. I am not planning to heat it this winter but assume that i can grow some greens inside without heating in our zone. Am i right?

thanks
 
If you can keep it above 28º at night your greens will love it. I would be more worried about it getting too hot during the day. That daytime heat will keep it warm enough thru the night.

I don't have a greenhouse, but wishing for one!
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Everything that blooms and grows, the garden angel scatters and sows...in the land of corn and pigs...Iowa Zone 4-5

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I am also new to greenhouse gardening, just got my greenhouse in Sept but have started lettuce and spinach in early Nov and am getting a good crop without heating the greenhouse. I am in Portland Or and have had a few nights around 30 degrees. I was told to keep the trays on the top racks and to the back of the greenhouse. This is supposed to be the warmest area. Good luck with your new greenhouse. Im having fun just learning.
 
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Yes, you can grow all sorts of greens, especially mache, and other stuff. Probably the best guide around is Eliot Coleman's book, The Four Season Harvest.
 
Live as though you'd die tomorrow. Learn as though you would live forever.
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I am using an unheated greenhouse this year for the first time. I have my bay tree overwintering in there, along with a few other potted herbs.
I have artichokes growing in the ground and they are doing very well. I hope by the time I things start warming up around here, they will be ready to transplant to the garden.
 
A dream of gardens foretells great joy.
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I am also a new greenhouse owner in the Northwest. I appreciate all the comments about not having to heat the greenhouse! Any advice about keeping a new Meyer lemon tree happy?
 
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We have a 24-foot x 10-foot lean-to greenhouse attached to the back of our garage. It has about four feet of exposed concrete on the back wall from the garage foundation and it is built four feet down into the ground with earth on three sides (fourth side is our entrance).

The growing benches are raised earthen beds with a narrow sunken isle down the center that ends up serving as a 'cold-sink' (see the study of Prof Emery Myers Emmert's greenhouse designs from Eliot Coleman's "The Winter Harvest Manual").

This is our first winter growing things in a GH. We are also growing greens under cold frames in the garden. The greenhouse tends to run about 4º to 5º warmer when outside temps are above 25º. As it gets colder the temperature differential grows. So far, the coldest it has been here is 17º and the greenhouse hit 26º that night.

The cold frames don't offer any insulation. They simply protect the plants from the elements (frost, wind, snow). We have mesclun, spinach, green onions, and cilantro growing in the cold frames from a planting the last week in August.

Amazingly, all of these greens have survived 17º and multiple nights below 20º. They revive themselves on sunny days and keep growing. And we keep sniping for fresh salads.

We also have some parsley growing outside under two layers of floating row covers that are exhibiting plenty of new growth since being covered in November.

We have a small crop of onions thriving right now in the greenhouse and we were picking tomatoes and peppers from the greenhouse until the first week in December. We also picked Basil from the greenhouse until the week before Thanksgiving, and cukes until around mid-October.

Our experience has confirmed Eliot's writing - that when plants are protected from the elements they can withstand much colder temperatures than we would expect.

As the days get longer in February and March we're planning to conduct experiments with several new plantings of various things.
 
You don't stop dancing because you've grown old. You grow old because you've stopped dancing. - apologies to G.B. Shaw
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I am going to use my greenhouse space to harden off some of my seedlings very soon. The artichokes are happy and the biggest I have grown so far.
We have had several freezes and plenty of sunny days so its hard to keep temps regulated. I leave the vent open most of the time to keep my plants from burning up. I wish I had put the bay tree in my garage since it is so heavy to move and it looks a little crispy around the edges right now.
 
A dream of gardens foretells great joy.
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goldpearl,
wondering what kind of bay tree do you have? I live in zone 7 too but in PNW and have my bay tree in ground, it's doing fine during winter, I need just to remove snow from it on snowy days.
 
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Mine is a Bay Laurel. We get some freezes here and I didn't want to lose it. I hope it will recover in spring. I think I let it get too hot in there, so now I am leaving the vent open.
I have a potted azalea in there too and it looks a little brown around the edges too. Both of these plants are new to me.
Maybe I should plant mine in the ground this spring.
 
A dream of gardens foretells great joy.
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We get plenty of freezes here and my Bay Laurel and azaleas are perfect outside.
 
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