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Rat living in my garage

I saw a rat running into my garage today. I heard lots of squeaking in the garage leading me to believe there might be a nest.

I should have known better than growing my catalopes on the ground. They eat them.

How can I prevent them from eating my watermelons?

Furthermore, is there a big reason I should get rid of the rats, either by relocation or poison?
 
Yes! Get rid of the rats.

Just for beginners, they can spread disease.

They will make a mess of things in your garage.

Droppings and urine everywhere.

They will chew on most anything.

They will eat your veggies.

They multiply rapidly.

You decide!
 

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Gardening at 5000 ft. elevation in Northern Utah  Zone 5

Have a great gardening day!

http://donce.lofthouse.com/jam...lanting/planting.htm

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I'd go with rat traps... poison can kill cats or anything else that may eat those dead rats, including large predatory birds. Also poisoned dead rats tend to put out a big stink if they are in the walls or someplace you can't get to them.

As far as live traps and relocating, is there anyone you hate that much that you would transport rats to their place?
 
Plant seeds in the sunshine, dance in the rain
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Like James said, rats can carry and spread disease. They can also chew on the wiring in your garage and cause an electrical fire. Plus, if you live in a cold winter climate they could decide to chew their way into your home.

And I agree with pinky, don’t use poison as other unintended animals can take it in. Plus you have no control over where the dead bodies will end up.

I would get some large rat traps and nail them down to an even bigger board or chain them to the garage wall so if a rat isn’t killed right away it won’t carry off your trap. Bait the trap with peanut butter on the trigger. The peanut butter will stick to the trigger mechanism making it harder for the rats to steal and more likely that they will stick around and get caught. Peanut butter will also give off a scent that will attract the rats. I would put a box over the trap with a hole in it so a neighbors dog doesn’t get trapped if it is drawn to the peanut butter scent also.
 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ LAUS DEO, Where ever I go, there I am. ..... major at nwi dot net ..... Zone 6a, Eastern Washington, sagebrush high desert, Columbia plateau.
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They're tricky little buggers. Figured out how to take the peanut butter off BF's traps last summer without springing the traps. He set up a camera to tape them doing it so he could foil 'em on the next round. They did eventually move on, he thinks.
 
- - - - - - - - - - - - Elizabeth www.WordCures.com
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My neighbor's Yorkshire terrier kills rats. I think they're bred for that. My Maine Coon cat would make short work of it, too. Does anybody have a cat or some kind of terrier you could borrow?
 
[hr]Jennifer in zone 10, Los Angeles, Sunset zone 22
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This is my problem, too. Our neighbor's cat just died. How can I tactfully suggest he get another cat, preferably a big tomcat who's a good mouser/ratter...
 
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Just go to the pound or the newspaper and get a kitten/cat. I think cats arebetter garden/house allies than the popular media would ever let us believe... I am someone who has been preaching the benefits of herbs over pesticides for the last 20 years.... No fleas
here. Cats kill things, yes, its true, but when you look/think about life's total picture.. that cat is worth it's weight in gold... ie..pest prevention/elimination.
 
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My dh pointed out a dead RAT in the front yard today. BLECK!! I'm guessing one of our cats caught it and killed it. It was small as far as rats go...they can get as big as a cat...and sooooooooo gross!! They cannot control their bladder or bowel and therefore leave a trail of feces and urine!! How absolutely discusting is that!! So I'm glad for the 4 cats we have, but only one is no hunter at all.

I'm concerned about traps for fear of hurting our cats.

Hopefully they found this rat in one of the nearby fields or pasture and not in our house or unused barn or henhouse.
 
[hr]The whole world is a narrow bridge; the important thing is not to be afraid.
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Snap traps! Quick, relatively painless, and far more humane than the traps that go by the name of "humane." The kind of rats that co-habitate with humans are not equipped to survive in "the wild." Relocating them is a slow death sentence for them at best.

You'll have to change the positions and types of bait frequently, though--rats are smart buggers.

Or you could try enticing a large rat snake to your environs. Cats are good for that too. Good luck! Yuck, rats! (And that's from someone who is a fan of rodents as pets--but not rodents as uninvited house/garage guests--ick!).
 
Blogging about life, the universe, and ducks at www.curiositycat.me
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