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Yeast in the garden ... or.... CALLING CAPTAIN COMPOST!!!!

OK...I admit it...I'm not good at cipherin'...

AND I can't turn down a good deal.

$16.00 for a 10 lb. box of dry yeast is a BIG bargain when 8 oz. normally sells for around $5.00.

Now my better judgement has kicked in and I've realized there is NO WAY this much yeast will ever keep long enough for me to use it up in baked goods. Can anyone tell me if there is a good use for this much yeast in the garden - either put in a manure tea or in a compost pile or ANYTHING?????? I plan on freezing part of it...as much as I know I can use up in a year's time. But I hate to have the rest of it go to waste if there is a use for it in the garden in some capacity.

Any ideas???
 
Here's what I do:
1) freeze the whole bunch, vaccuum sealing what I know I won't use in a year. I vaccuum seal in 2# lots.

2) test the year-old stuff I each week I want to use it, it's usually good.

Good luck composting it!
 
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I have had some cooking yeast in my freezer for over two years now, and I've never had a problem with it making the bread rise--and I do mean RISE! Also, i let my bread rise three times--twice in the bowl, and once in the loaf pans.

I get my yeast real cheap (2 pounds for about 3.99) at Sam's. I use it, I roll up the bag and clip it closed until the next time. The freezing seems to stop the yeast from degrading at all.

Hope this helps!

Theresa
 
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Yeast is of course a beneficial fungus. If you want to do it, yeast would be excellent in an aerobic gardening tea. Yeast is produced automatically in all my aerated teas because of the fermenting molasses and other grain or fruit products in my compost teas.

Most organic soil scientists like Dr. Elaine Ingham, from SoilFoodWeb.com, suggest adding more fungi and fungal foods to aerated compost teas anyway. Most teas are bacterial, which is fine. Bacterial teas release more nitrogen and microbes than any other major or micronutrients. But fungal teas are higher in releasing and breaking down available phosphorus from organic matter and the soil.
I believe the mycorhizza fungi is beneficial in releasing more phosphorus to plant roots in the soil.
 
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This may sound odd....but the 'ole timers' around here suggest using the old yeast in the septic tank! Just flush it!

Smiler
 
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I've also heard of the yeast and buttermilk trick to feed the anaerobic microbes in the septic tank!
 
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Thanks everyone....Clanmesa, if you've had that good of luck keeping it viable for 2 years, I guess I'll just package it up and keep it in the freezer until it quits working for me!

Hey Captain....I don't make compost tea but I do occasionally make manure tea with aged manure. Can you give me a suggestion on how much yeast to add to a 5 gallon bucket of water and manure? And how long would you suggest letting it 'brew' with the yeast? Thanks for any information you can share with me on this...the way my life is right now, I have to do things simply with as few ingredients as possible! I really appreciate your help and willingness to share what you know with all of us!! Smiler
 
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Speaking of brewing, you might consider using some of that huge amount of yeast to make alcoholic beverages with. After all, beer is just a tea made with a heck of a lot of high-sugar veggies and other sugar sources, add a little yeast, and let it go 'bad'. Heck, you might hit on a recipe you like this year.

One of my friends even made beer from beets. Whoooh!
 
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Due to my well-documented and inexplicable deep-seated psychological fear of yeast (with which you are familiar, Buffalogal)....I respectfully refrained from replying to your question.

Obviously, it didn't matter a rat's hiney, as you've already got the best selection of answers! Big Grin

gardenz
 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ [i]"To Live Is Not Just To Survive, But To Thrive With Passion, Compassion, Humor & Style."[/i] ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ My Blogs: [URL=http://www.lindafrank.blogspot.com] GardenzOwn [/URL] [URL=http://www.OurGardenEarth.blogspot.com]OurGardenEarth[/URL]
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How was it? I left a radish sitting in water over night and it sure smelled real good. I was like"I'm smelling beer or wine."
 
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It doesn't really matter how much yeast you add to a garden tea brew. I would suggest no more than 1-2 cups of yeast per gallon of water, or should I say manure/compost tea water.
 
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Hmmm...so little yeast, so many possibilities! Big Grin

Hadn't thought about making BEER....I wonder if homemade wines contain yeast? I know so little about so many things.

Thanks for the good ideas!
 
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I'd look into it a little more before I attempted the beer, I'm pretty sure it's a different form of yeast than that for baking. I keep my yeast in the freezer - bought a double vacuum pack at B.J.'s 1 1/2 years ago - it's still working fine. I would like to make some dandelion wine some day - you ferment it for months - just in time for my b-day in February.
 
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Yeast will last for years in the freezer.
Paula
zone 9
 
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