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Sprouts?

Who uses Sprouts? Do you have to buy the seeds in special stores? They can be grownin jars, right? What kinds of seeds do you use for sprouts?

Help!

Anything you can tell me about using sprouts in salads will be a big help.

Thanks for any information.

Altagarden
MI Z4-5
 
I love sprouts...especially on sandwiches...they crunch so nicely. I use them in stir fry (the bigger ones) and salads, too, though...I just toss them in to taste. I use wheat, alfalfa, mung bean, soybean, pea, lentil, radish, broccoli, cabbage, onion, clover, sesame, chia, mustard...just about anything. Something I have discovered about the larger sprouts is that if you sprout them in soil and cut them, they taste sweeter.

You can grow them in anything that allows some light in, and can be easily drained. I use mesh over the tops of jars to pour the water out of, and I save the sprout water for my plants.

The only thing special about the seeds is that they are not treated with any chemicals or fertilizers and are food grade. You can use your own home saved stuff, if you like.
 
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We use sprouts. We like alfalfa for general salad/sandwich use, broccoli, radish, and onion for salad, and the big bean sprouts for stir-fry, egg rolls, and to substitute for rice beds for sweet & sour, cashew pork, ect... Haven't tried sesame yet, but I want to.
I've heard of sprouting peanuts and other large legumes, but what do you do with such big sprouts? (Salad???)

You can get sprouting seeds at health food stores, and I got some large Ferry-Morse packets for sprouting at Wal-Mart last year (? year before??). Territorial, The Cook's Garden, and Pinetree Garden Seeds all sell sprouting seeds in differing sizes, from 1 oz up to 1 lb. (Please note with some of the more spicy flavors or tiny seeds, an ounce goes further than you'd think.)Territorial also sells a wheel that tells what amount for what type of seed, flavors, etc... All of the above also sell different types of sprouters. And Pinetree sells the plastic mesh, screw on, wide mouth jar-toppers. We use those. They say you can use jar rings and cheesecloth, but it sounds like more of a hassle. (Now I want to try using a little screened compost to see if they do taste better sprouted in soil!)

If you sprout in a jar, use a tablespoon or so (??) of seed (less for the spicy ones, maybe a teaspoon?), and soak them in warmish water (NOT hot) in your wide-mouth jar overnight. The next morning, drain and rinse your seed and rinse morning and evening, draining afterwards. When not rinsing, let your jar rest on its side, on a plate (to catch drips), with a dish towel draped over it to keep some of the light out. (I leave the jar mouth uncovered.) The plastic lids are nice, because you can rinse some of the seed hulls out under the tap. After your sprouts have sprung, you can take the towel off to let them green up on a sunny windowsill. Then store them in the 'fridge and try to use them in a couple of days. They taste best when they are fresh.

Has anyone sprouted the bigger beans (peanuts, blackeyes, etc...), and if so, what do you use them for?
 
~ True grits, more grits, fish grits and collards. Life is good, where grits are swollar'd.
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Oh yeah, I forgot to ask - - can any herb seed be used for sprouts? I was thinking that maybe chive seed would work. Are any of the herbs suitable for sprouting culture? Dill, or maybe cilantro? (I know rosemary would be out - out of 500 seeds, you'd get what, maybe 5 sprouts? If that.)
 
~ True grits, more grits, fish grits and collards. Life is good, where grits are swollar'd.
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Yes, Chive seeds work great. They taste fabulous in soups and salads...like green onions, only sweeter. Other sprouts, like dill and fennel are also great.

The beans and larger sprouts I particularly like on sandwiches...nice crunch to them...and stir fry (add last, so they don't get soggy) and salads.
 
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Huh. Thanks! Smiler I am going to have to try that. Ever sprouted sesame seed?
Just curious. Big Grin
 
~ True grits, more grits, fish grits and collards. Life is good, where grits are swollar'd.
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Yup. And flax and chia and clover and amaranth...all of them are quite good. The grain seeds seem to be on the sweet side, but not as sweet as the pea and beans. Sort of nutty-sweet.
 
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Is millet sproutable? Have to try the flax; I've got both regular and golden. Thanx.
 
~ True grits, more grits, fish grits and collards. Life is good, where grits are swollar'd.
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Millet is sproutable..yes
 
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I sprout seeds all the time, of all different types. I get most of my seeds from a local health food store, which has many organic seeds, which are better to sprout, since they haven't been treated anywhere along the way. Today I got adzuki, lentil, and some spelt, which I sprout for bread. I have also sprouted fennel, radish, and onion seeds, which have the flavors you would expect, though mild, and many of the usual beans and grains. It's easy and they're all good.
 

Dave    in Woodbury, NJ  zone 6B

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I been terying the sprouts with many different types. But Soybean and lentals both soured on me My cat walked away. the soys expandeded and sent out a shoot then grew no more. and soured. I do buy my seeds from whole foods all organic section. the lentals were the biggest flop boo hoo. Maybe the cold temps. the counter was cool what do yuo recommenened.? We use w wide mouth pint mason jar with the band andcheese cloth on top. I will try laying them on there side and slighlt covering them two the others do not need to be covered in my kitchen. mayeb they do helppp me. I love sprouts for the DW and also 4 my self. Sprouts make you feel good to!
 
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Beans, especially soy and lentils, need vigorous washing and removal of their husks to keep from fermenting. I had some experiences with nasty slimey bubbly sprouts, too. What I do now for beans, peas, and lentils is to soak them overnight in water, hot, right out of the tap. Then I drain them and soak them again, draining and washing them at least three times a day. once they start to burst their jackets and sprout I remove the jackets by washing them off, and pouring them out into the compost, and drain the beans onto a paper towel or thin sponge in the seed starter to keep them from sitting in the water. They stay damp, but not soggy wet. Keep them washed off at least three times a day, well drained, warm, and keep taking the jackets, or husks off and they should not spoil. While most sprouts don't mind cool temps, beans require warm ones to grow quickly, so keep them warm so that they won't spoil before they are of a size to eat.
 
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tell me more about washing off their jackets ? do you do it in a collander, a plate, a seed sprouter, use your hands? or water? Mine are sending out shoots now and doubled in size. Going on day 3 and just a follow up thanks Brenne
 
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Oops, sorry...didn't check this message til today. I fill up a container with water, agitate gently, then pour off the jackets.
 
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