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Can any plant go into the compost?

Are there any plants, flowers, veggies, herbs that should not go into it? Some of my plants are winding down for the season and flowers that I have bought to decorate inside are dying.

I am trying to bring in some herbs but I have just so much space for them.
 

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 Have a great gardening day! hoe, hoe, hoe Pea

 Upstate NY, zone 5

I don't put any of the allium family (onions, garlic, etc.) in mine... I might exclude thyme as well. These plants have pretty strong antibiotic properties, which is not good for the composting process.
 

Northwest Georgia, Zone 7b

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It is generally recommended NOT to compost any diseased tomato plants. Other than that I pretty much compost everything. A very hot pile will kill most seeds but if your pile is not hot enough, composting weeds with lots of seeds will spread them everywhere in your garden when you use the compost.
 

 Zone 7b  Southeastern PA

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Learned the hard way to avoid putting anything w/ any kind of developed seed heads in the compost. Even w/ a hot pile, the edges don't get hot enough to cook seeds. And even with the most careful turning, there's going to be a certain percentage that land in the cooler area again.

Nope, weeds that have gone to seed and diseased tomato vines go into either the trash, or if I have the (rare) initiative, get buried quite deeply 'way in the back.
 

Chicago burb, Zone 6a 

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I also put everything into the compost pile except seed heads and the rare diseased plant matter.

I also chop things up into smaller pieces- kitchen scraps with a knife, garden scraps with a garden scissor.

I have heard of people using their garbage disposal so that it grinds kitchen scraps and empties into a bucket under the sink, rather than down the drain. If I had a garbage disposal I would definitely do that.
 

 


Zone 5/6  Northern New Mexico

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Poison Ivy, Poison Oak, and Poison Sumac are three that probably should not ever be composted, but anything else can be. Some people will not compost any "weeds" because they have been given bad information about them. Some people will not compost alliums because they think they suppress bacterial activity. Some people will not compost diseased plant material, which should not be done if your compost does not get hot enough to kill the disease pathogens.
Any plant material you do not compost, or till back into the soil, means valuable nutrients you are throwing away.
 

The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.

West central Michigan along the lakeshore.

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i read somewhere not to put garlic, or citrus - so i leave those out, seeds i leave out becuase i dont know how hot my pile is. i had this wonderful 8 yr old pile out back of one rental i lived at - it ate everything, in 6 months! even avocado peels, spaghetti squash peels, banana peels, egg shells - all that was left was the silly sticker w/ the code on it from the store! lol
 

»☼Ö®≡Gö∩RΣÐ☺«

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Willemette Valley Oregon, 7A?  Member since 2005

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That post reminded me of the compost song from some years back! Dirt posted it originally.

http://eclectech.co.uk/compostbin.php
 

God Almighty first planted a garden. And indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures. Francis Bacon

 

Virginia  Zone 7

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I use everything. Nature composts everything. Some material is segregated where it can be watched for years in a separate area in case something grows that I'm not particularly fond of like wild mustard.

As far as citrus is concerned, there is a lime tree that was having what I suspect were blossom end rot issues; 50% of the fruit had it at one time. I made bokashi in a 32-gallon Rubbermaid container out of the spoiled fruit after it was run through a shredder. When it was finished, I spread it under the drip line of the tree in a narrow band where the leaf litter had been pulled back. The bokashi band made it about half way around the tree, and then was recovered with the leaf litter.

I don't remember how long it was before I checked its progress, but when I did there was an earth worm explosion in that band. The worms looked like a mass of spaghetti with sauce.

I did that a few years ago. The quantity of fruit without the problem has increased to 90 percent, and most of the limes get to the size of a baseball; of course, I let them ripen before harvest. Ripe limes are yellow and juicy not the little green rocks sold at the grocery.

LtT
 
I am grateful that the innate ability for Cosmos to function does not depend on human understanding or acceptance.
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There are those that caution against composting citrus and allium family (garlic and onions) members and most of what I can find about that is related to potential diseases. So if we were to not compost plant material because of potential diseases we would not compost anything.
If one were to compost a ton or so of eitehr one at once there might be a problem unless adjustments to the process were made, but if one were to compost an orange, lemon, lime peel or onion or garlic skins once ar twice a week, as I have often, there will be no problem.
 

The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.

West central Michigan along the lakeshore.

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hmmm... good to know
 

»☼Ö®≡Gö∩RΣÐ☺«

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Willemette Valley Oregon, 7A?  Member since 2005

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I throw citrus peels in the compost with no problem; garlic and onion peels also. I think the rejection of these is more conjectural than realistic. You could predict that if something has anti-bacterial properties, it won't compost well, but if you actually try it, you will find it does. Reality overrules speculation.
 

Abigail, all 9 kids grown and 16 little gardeners: what a harvest!

Zone 7a, Far Rockaway, New York

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Welcome Carlo. I always have seeds sprout from compost, no matter how smoking hot it gets. A lot sprout when the pile is cooling down, and they become part of the compost after I turn it. I had a lot of chickweed sprout in my newest bed that was made this fall. It became part of the daily salads this week.
 

Abigail, all 9 kids grown and 16 little gardeners: what a harvest!

Zone 7a, Far Rockaway, New York

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Why no poplar in the compost?
 
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I have composted Wild Morning Glory (Bindweed), conifer needles, Poplar leaves, Rose prunings, small limbs from many trees and wood chips with no problem. No Ivy and no Bermuda grass so I have not been able to compost them, however, I do have a friend that does with no problem. The seeds from the Bermuda grass can be a problem she tells me but not the grass blades.
 

The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.

West central Michigan along the lakeshore.

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