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tomato (internal) rot?

Went to harvest the first Opalka paste tomatoes of the season -- the first fruit had blossom end rot, no huge surprise given the weird rain/dry we've had recently (in northern NJ). But then I picked 3 other fruit (from two Opalkas on opposite sides of my small vegetable garden, not side by side). One had a small browned end (the beginning of end rot?) and the rest of that tomato seemed OK. But when I sliced each of the three open lengthwise, each had a small brown rotted section near the middle. (One also had some softening apparent from the outside.)

What is this? I read somewhere about the possibility of internal blossom end rot, and some folk noting that Opalka seemed to be more likely to get BER. But I'm guessing...

Trouble in paradise?

Deb
 
So many of my Opalkas had blossom end rot big time that I'll never grow it again. And the conditions here are much different from yours, so I don't think it's anything we did. None of the other tomatoes had any b.e.r. at all.
 
[hr]Jennifer in zone 10, Los Angeles, Sunset zone 22
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What you saw is related to Blossom End Rot. Charlie Nardozzi, horticulturist for the National Gardening Association, wrote this about BER in an article some time back;
Blossom-End Rot
What it looks like: Brown-black sunken areas appear on the blossom end of green or ripening fruit.
Causes: Insufficient calcium levels in the developing fruit cause the cells in the blossom end to break down. Though insufficient levels of calcium in the soil may be the cause, it is more likely fluctuating moisture levels. This is why it is important to apply a mulch. Water transports calcium through the plant. With insufficient water, calcium doesn't move quickly enough to the fruits. As little as 30 minutes of water deficiency at any time can cause blossom-end rot.
These other factors contribute but are all ultimately connected to calcium availability in the developing fruit: excess nitrogen fertilization, high soil salinity, waterlogged soils, root damage during cultivation, and soil pH that's too low or too high. Blossom-end rot occurs most often on the first fruit clusters, when the plant grows quickly and demands calcium for leaf growth.
What to do: Pick and destroy rotten fruits, keep the soil pH around 6.5, reduce nitrogen fertilization, and apply a complete fertilizer such as 5-10-10 (1/2 cup per 10-foot row) once early in the growing season. Also, mulch early in the season with a 4- to 6-inch layer of hay or straw. Apply at least 1 1/2 inches of water a week, and avoid growing susceptible older indeterminates (vining tomatoes) such as 'Beefsteak' and both determinate and indeterminate varieties of plum tomatoes ('Roma' is one example).
but this is still about the best explanation I have seen of BER. We also know BER can result if the soil is too wet, same thing, plants cannot uptake nutrients if the soil is too wet.
 

The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.

West central Michigan along the lakeshore.

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