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OG recipe for comfrey salve

I've have for years used the method of having my herbs exposed to the sun immersed in olive oil for 6 weeks in order to make salve.
When I read about making salve in a day with the same properties especially using a double boiler[heat), I question the strength of the salve and the value of the herbs. I know once you expose heat to vegetables, they lose their value. Organic broccoli if steamed has a nutritious value of 85 % If microwaved has a nutritious value of 15%.
I will continue to make my salves from the heat of the sun. Would like some input.
 
In my own practice, when I need to infuse oil, I go with the longer, sunlight method as well, which I think removes every last bit of the herb's components. Heating on the stove is faster, and I don't think the components are completely transferred to the oil, therefore all the beneficial bits of the herb are not available to use.

Comfrey is a very powerful healer, and when used on an open wound, caution must be used that the wound is clear of debris. Comfrey treatments have been known to go so fast in the healing that particles of dirt and bacteria can get trapped under the new tissue. For someone without that knowledge, it would be better to make a comfrey salve that did not work as fast - hence the use of hot oil infusion.

(I do feel boiling water infusions are excellent).
 
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Comfrey is my favorite herb. Around this area it used to be called, "Boneknit" because it can be used in healing fractures.

I once saved a dogs leg. I know when the animal went missing and it was found ten days later in a beaver trap beside a stream of water. The dog was brought to me and I cleaned up the paw. It was pretty awful. For three days I applied comfrey poutices before the fellow could get his dog to a vet. The vet couldn't believe the paw.
He said, "Whoever did what they did to this dog has probably saved its life. I can save the leg", but he did have to amputate a couple of toes. The dog lived out a wonderful life with his owner. The owner of this particular dog was so distraught with his disappearance, so he went fishing and found his dog in a trap. The stream kept the little guy alive for ten days.

Back to comfrey. I've been making the salve for about twenty years and wouldn't be without it in my household.

When I worked in the North, and I mean the north, I would dry the root and powder it for first aid in the bush.

I agree Loamlump, you have to be careful with it because it does heal incredibly fast.

I personally have cooked the herb root and ingested it. There's alot of info about it being hard for the liver, but I did heal myself of something years ago and I'm still kicking. Caution does need to be taken with ingestion though, and you do need to know what you are doing.

I once helped a fellow with extreme tendinitus of the arm from chainsawing. We made a poultice from a puree of the leaves and applied it to his forearms regularly. It took a little while, but helped him tremendously.

I wouldn't be without my comfrey! Smiler
 
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Are you referring to "Sun Tea" method of extracting the oils? I am new to this posting although I'm not new to "Organic Gardening" The magazine or the concept.
I would like to know more about this OG recipe for Comfrey Salve. I would like to learn how to extract the oils from the plants I know heal. (Comfrey included)
I'm just getting up to home computer access (just now getting to make myself set down at the computer instead of the Television.)
 
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It could be called the "Sun tea method", but I only know what I do for which I don't have a name other than making salves.

There are so many people on this site that know the terms etc., but I just know what I do and have been taught by so many people throughout the years.

It's like yesterday, I'm out at my farm going through my garden and buddy pulls in to talk about the annual church supper. His wife is making baked beans and she wanted some salt pork. He was complaining that he couldn't buy it anywhere. I told him I make it on a regular basis and invited him to come back to my home where I could give him some for her beans. Yes, I know, someone sent him to my place, but I just do what I do and I never refuse to help anyone out within limits.. Homesteading, living off the land...call it what you may, I've been taught a great deal over the years and appreciate and utilize what I've been taught. I just don't have the up to date names for it all. This site and all the wonderful people on it might be able to help you with some of your questions.
 
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Sun Tea, or Sun Steeping. I just posted about this on the Crafts forum, 'What About Chafing' thread.
 
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Lavender oil is also a great healer. It is a natural antibiotic. The fleshy part under his forearm was cut with a chainsaw. After a visit to the hospital and some stitches the wound was "weeping" which is not a very nice site. After several minutes of convincing he let me put lavender oil on the wound over the stitches. I did it 2 times the next day and by the 3rd evening it had stopped. My husband, being the delicate flower he is Wink , wouldn't allow me to put anymore on it because he said it smelled bad. When he went back to the doctor to get the stitches removed a week or so later the doc was impressed with the healing time and asked why his stitches were purple. He explained I had used a homemade remedy but wouldn't tell what it was.

My brother in law was in a wreck recently and had several cuts and scabs on his arms and hands. I took the bottle of Lavender to him and told him to rub it on about 1-2 times a day. Not only did it increase healing time, it softened the scabs and also keep the cuts from getting stiff. he is now a believer.

I also use it on my cat. He is a tom and about 14 years old and every couple once in awhile comes in with scratches and wounds, usually from a stray someone has put out in our yard and is eating from his dish. Not only does it heal his wounds, he won't lick the affected area to clean it and the other animals stay away from him because of the smell.

I have made a salve of it with the beeswax from our hives, but prefer to use it full strength from the bottle, purchased at the health food store.
 
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had anyone tried solomon seal salce and or tinture ,and how they compare to comfrtey
 
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