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Need advice transplanting lilacs!

Hey everyone! Long time, no see! Sorry for the hiatus, but I needed to focus more on my school work and other aspects of my life...

Anyways! I have a question. I have three lilac... bushes? I don't know if one would consider them bushes or trees. But I have three lilacs, one is quite small, and the other two are big. The small plant and one of the big plants are blooming, but my grandmother wants them, and my mom wants me to, essentially, get rid of them. How would I do this with minimal shock and injury to these plants? The Original tree had to be cut down, because it was dying from powdery mildew, and was really congested.

Chris J.

PS: I'll post pictures of the plants later on.
PPS: If anyone wants to know, I am a senior this year, I received 2 scholarships, and I'm getting my braces off! YAY!
 
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~* "As one learns more and more, they learn that they know less and less." I live in Zone 5/6 NY...Differs due to Lake Erie.... Visit My Blog! http://greenisthenewprada.blogspot.com
It is best to move them when dormant. That means waiting until November now. I don't know about moving the big ones. Depends on how big it is. You may be better off to see if it has some small shoots that can be moved. Lilacs often send up shoots from the roots which can be dug up and moved.
 

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Gardening at 5000 ft. elevation in Northern Utah  Zone 5

Have a great gardening day!

http://donce.lofthouse.com/jam...lanting/planting.htm

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I have moved lilac shoots before, it would be quite a job to move an entire established bush due to the root system. You would have to dig a really big root ball and do it as James said, when dormancy has set in.

I did move shoots in the early spring, when leaves were just emerging. Dig a hole, put in plenty of compost if you have it. (They love it.) Keep it plenty wet for a couple weeks. My bushes survived and are growing, though slowly because they are in a fence/tree line.
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Everything that blooms and grows, the garden angel scatters and sows...in the land of corn and pigs...Iowa Zone 4-5

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It is never, ever necessary to cut down a Lilac that has Powdery Mildew because while it may look bad it does no harm to the shrub, and is easily treated if necessary. Lilacs grow wild with no care at all all over and have really bad looking leaves from Powdery Mildew and blossoms every year profusely.
Transplanting those shrubs can be done, but the sizr of the root ball, 1-1/2 times as wide as the shrub, may be too large to handle, easily. If you do transplant these while they are dormant is best.
 

The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.

West central Michigan along the lakeshore.

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Thanks everyone for your replies! I guess I will have to tell my mom about this...

quote:
Originally posted by Kimm1:
It is never, ever necessary to cut down a Lilac that has Powdery Mildew because while it may look bad it does no harm to the shrub, and is easily treated if necessary. Lilacs grow wild with no care at all all over and have really bad looking leaves from Powdery Mildew and blossoms every year profusely.

Transplanting those shrubs can be done, but the size of the root ball, 1-1/2 times as wide as the shrub, may be too large to handle, easily. If you do transplant these while they are dormant is best.



Kimm, it wasn't my decision to cut the lilac bush/tree down. My mom and dad decided to get rid of it because the oak in the neighbor's yard was overshadowing it, and the tree/bush was choking itself due to the congestion. I just added the powdery mildew part because I remember every year the plant was attacked by it.
 
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~* "As one learns more and more, they learn that they know less and less." I live in Zone 5/6 NY...Differs due to Lake Erie.... Visit My Blog! http://greenisthenewprada.blogspot.com
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Oh! I forgot the pictures. Well, here they are:

The Two big lilacs, one of which is going to my grandmother:
http://picasaweb.google.com/Christopher.Joya/Plants/photo#5063710950723289922

Small one that I am going to use as a bonsai:
http://picasaweb.google.com/Christopher.Joya/Plants/photo#5063711036622635858
 
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~* "As one learns more and more, they learn that they know less and less." I live in Zone 5/6 NY...Differs due to Lake Erie.... Visit My Blog! http://greenisthenewprada.blogspot.com
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Those Lilac(syringa vulgaris?) look a-ok to me...not all that big for that particular lilac...don't seem an emergency situation or a dire problem right now.
Best advice is to move during dormancy(fall or VERY early spring- because the photo #1 Lilac is a good size)
If you MUST because of pressure...do like Mr.Kimm says and then water-water-water...three times per week if no rain.
Good luck and happy to 'see' you around here again!
Congrats on your graduation from HS;have wonderful time-keep us 'posted' OK?
 
"Maybe one of the secrets of survival is to learn where to dance." Stanley Kunitz
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