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next year, late squash planting

I have heard for many years that late planting worked against some bugs like the squash bugs and the SVB fly. I tried it on a few occasionas planting about 3 weeks later but they always found me so instead of May 20, I would do like June 10th or 12th. That did not work either. What the heck??!!?

So I started companion planting and it seems to work for the squash bug, so far at least, 2 years doing this. But the SVB fly has gotten the best of me.

Since I moved to my present location I have 2 farm stands that sells their pumpkins and squashes I have noticed that one planted like 2 weeks ago who also planted his corn and peppers as well and the other planted last week. Eeker

Maybe I didn't plant late enough! Ya think? Something to try for next year.

Thoughts?
 

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 Have a great gardening day! hoe, hoe, hoe Pea

 Upstate NY, zone 5

I think you are right about not planting late enough. I have had quite a bit of trouble getting summer squash this year. I planted about every three weeks or so, starting in late May. I made my last planting about 3 weeks ago. They seem to be doing ok, as is the planting made at the very end of June, but most of the other plants are done for. Usually it is SVB that does them in, but this year the plants are suffering from disease as well.
 

North Central Illinios

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I do about 3 plantings of summer squash. I do the first one as early as possible. SVB's are not laying eggs in my area until about June 20 so I can get a crop before they kill my plants but by then my second crop is coming along to replace it.

I planted a third crop about a week ago. I had space where I dug up the potatoes anysay.
 

 Zone 7b  Southeastern PA

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You might very well have better luck with later planting...an experiment for next spring? Smiler

I don't think it's possible for me to plant late enough to avoid SVB. I've tried. This is what I'm going to try next spring. It's a c. moschata and as such should be more resistant to SVB.
 

~~~To plant is to believe in tomorrow~~~

Mobile, Alabama   Zone 8b

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I am going to plant zukes again this weekend, and mulch extremely heavy. Have only gotten about 6, just too darn hot and dry.

I have been destroying egg clusters on the leaves, rarely do I have this much trouble with zucchini.
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Everything that blooms and grows, the garden angel scatters and sows...in the land of corn and pigs...Iowa Zone 4-5

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I have tried planting squash as late as 8-15, to no avail against the SVB. Don't know if it would work against the squash bug, however, as I don't have problems with that one around here.

I like the idea of that avocado squash, OB! moschata is all I can grow here, as well.
 

Dave    in Woodbury, NJ  zone 6B

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I have one volunteer well infested with squash bugs. The seeds must of been deep, since it came up LATE.

I have a number of other summer squash & zukes that were under a FRC until two weeks ago. I did a check today, and sadly did find some (minor) squash bug.

However, I haven't seen any signs of SVB so I'm hoping maybe the row cover prevented that problem, and the timing of when I removed the covers and the UConn literature on SVB would say I should be OK in theory.
 
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Seethe new topic- parthenocarpic squash. If no one has experimented with it yet, maybe we can next spring. It is basically a squash that develops without pollination, so there is no need to remove the row covers.
 

Abigail, all 9 kids grown and 16 little gardeners: what a harvest!

Zone 7a, Far Rockaway, New York

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YAY, wouldn't that be heavenly? But would it be organic?
 

**********************************************************

 Have a great gardening day! hoe, hoe, hoe Pea

 Upstate NY, zone 5

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Why not? The plants are just different varieties with this quality, not GMO's.
 

Abigail, all 9 kids grown and 16 little gardeners: what a harvest!

Zone 7a, Far Rockaway, New York

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quote:
It's a c. moschata and as such should be more resistant to SVB.


What kind of squash is it? Summer or winter? Have you eaten it? Do we know how it compares to other squashes?

Fess up, OB...j/k
 

**********************************************************

 Have a great gardening day! hoe, hoe, hoe Pea

 Upstate NY, zone 5

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Pea, I've not eaten them and can't even take credit for discovering their existence Smiler They ARE meant to be picked 'green' and eaten as a summer squash. Our local gardening editor/director of the Mobile Botanical Gardens, Bill Finch, recently wrote an article on them after trialing them in the MBG gardens. Here's some of what he had to say:

quote:
This year, I decided to expand my summer squash experience beyond tromboncino, and see what other green-picked hard-stemmed squashes the world had to offer. I tried several seeds sold under several different names, and loved them all so well and so equally, I’ve finally come to realize they may all be essentially the same plant. I’ve seen them marketed as “Persian zucchini” and “avocado squash,” particularly when they seeds come by way of Europe. When the seeds come from east Asia, they are often sold under the name “ball squash” or sometimes “Korean ball squash.”



quote:
Now I haven’t quite given up my affection for the old tromboncino. But I’ll tell you what, these “ball squash”— or whatever you want to call them — are amazing little green cannonballs, packed with flesh and flavor. They’re buttery tender when picked while the size of a peach. Personally, I like to pick them a little bigger, when they’re softball size, and I’m always impressed with how much they weigh. They’re dense with meat, and make amazing projectiles. I’ve made a supper course for two out of a single softball-sized fruit.

The flavor is outstanding. Some will want to know whether ball squash can be substituted for yellow squash, but that’s a little like asking whether filet mignon can be substituted for chuck steak. As with all moschatas, our cannonball squash is much richer tasting than a typical zucchini — but not unpleasantly assertive, so it plays well with other vegetables. It cooks like any yellow squash or zucchini, though because it is a little more dense, you might want to slice it a little thinner or cook it a few minutes longer to get the same texture. Those of us sharing the bounty have made everything from traditional black skillet squash to elaborate curries, and we’ve been impressed each time.



That was enough to sell me Smiler

You can read the whole article here if you'd like.

OB
 

~~~To plant is to believe in tomorrow~~~

Mobile, Alabama   Zone 8b

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I have grown these for 2 years now along with the yellow saucer squash and have loved them. Did not know that they resisted SVB. I just planted a second crop this week because I cannot keep them in my garden. My daughter comes up from San Diego to get fresh veggies from the garden and she loves them. I get a lot of fruit on 1 plant.
 
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