Forums
Search

cut pussy willow care

I just purchased some lovely pussy willows from my florist...it might sound stupid, but do they require the same care as other cut flowers? I.e. change water daily, etc. Thanks!
 
Fresh water will keep them going and if you keep them in it long enough some will even grow roots. The soft little fuzzes will start to burst open soon so if you wish to preserve them you might want to remove them from the water and spay them with fixative. I have one growing in my garden that has been cut and trained into an ornamental tree. The bark is a beautiful texture and green color. It is also one of the first things to come alive in the spring and is very lovely when the fuzz bursts into bloom.
 
Like (0 likes)
So, if the cut ones do form roots with water, I can simply plant them in dirt and they will form a plant? I had no idea, but am thrilled at the idea of it. What sort of environment do they thrive?
 
Like (0 likes)
Hi...

I wish I had seen a message about pussy willows LAST spring!

I moved to this house in Nov. and , in the spring, discovered several shrubs that turned out to be just that!

I cut some branches, just to see what they might become, and put them in a vase...I cut the branches when they were just budding, so I didn't know what plant they were...thought they might be forsythias...they had no leaves at the time...

Some of them rooted...but, in doing so, they did lose the fuzzy "pods" that are sold dried...

If I had known, I would have let them root, and planted them after I found out what they were, but I let them get the "fuzzy things on them and just let them stay in the vase...I didn't know they would lose the fuzzies, and just be rooting sprigs...

I think you are supposed to cut the branches when the "fuzzy things" are on them, on the bush, and just dry them like that...NOT put them in water in a vase...

...OR, cut the sprouting branches and root them to get more plants...at least that's what I think I learned this spring!
 
Like (0 likes)
I rooted about 10 cuttings this spring however only one that was transplanted is still alive. So...be sure to pick one that has plenty of roots formed. Mine seems to like it where there is plenty of water and sun. It took a couple of years of clipping to shape it into a tree form, but that works better in my garden then a bush. I have to prune it somewhat heavily a couple of times a year to keep its shape and then some minor clipping to maintain that. It started out as a bare root, weeping pussy willow that didn't grow and appeared dead. I yanked it out and low and behold a piece of root left behind started to grow. It is now a lovely tree.
 
Like (0 likes)
 
Post Reply
 
 
 


OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image