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Better flavor: malabar spinach or NZ spinach?

for those of you who have tried it, which do you think has a better flavor, either in cooked or raw?

I am finding that the seed catalogs are getting sneaky and are describing their seeds in unfair ways. They advertized some spinach seeds as "heat tolerant heirloom" and I thought, hey, great, they brought back a good old heirloom. But in tiny letters on the seed package it said New Zealand spinach, which isn't even a spinach. So now I'm wondering if it's worth the effort.
 
============= Love your soil.....feed your worms... (Used to be Sweetpea, contributing here since 2002)
I planted malabar this season, so i'll let you know when i try it.
 
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BiodiversityGal...we have grown both. I prefer the new zealand "spinach". The malabar is more fleshy and is pretty invasive.

They both make an OK substitute when the weather is too hot for spinach, but we are trying to eat other greens that will grow in the heat.

I wonder if it would be better to just have spinach when it is in season, not trying to find a substitute, but enjoying fully what is in season during the hot months.

Sorry about the rambling nature of that answer...should I delete everything but the first paragraph?

Peace

Gail
 
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But Peacegarden,

Isn't NZ spinach in season when it's hot??

But I like your response. What are "hot weather" greens?

I use a lot of mint in the high summer months, and some basil. Any main salad greens? I'm thinking parsley, but only grew it one year and can't remember it's habits...I'm just learning about the cool/warm dichotomies....
 
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I'm with Gail. I didn't care for the malabar. It didn't make it back into my garden the second year.
 
[hr][COLOR:GREEN] Just living is not enough... One must have sunshine, freedom, and a little flower. ~ Hans Christian Anderson[/COLOR]
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As a summer spinach substitute, my favorite is called Perpetual Spinach or Leaf Beet from Fedco. it is a kind of chard but without the big ribs and tastes similar to spinach. Goes all summer and lasts here through the winter, then goes to seed about now, just in time for the new crop to get going.
 
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the only issue with New Zealand spinach is it is not very appetizing raw.
 
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<What are "hot weather" greens?

I use a lot of mint in the high summer months, and some basil. Any main salad greens? >

Baby chard is good in salad, and it seems to do well in the heat. Beet greens are tasty sauteed in the summer, and you can pick a few baby leaves without damaging the root for salads.
Marveille des quatre saisons (marvel of four seasons) lettuce did very well for me last summer, it was much slower to bolt than the other lettuces when planted where it got some shade from the tomatoes. By the time it did bolt, I had sprouts coming up for my fall crop.
 
Julie in Colorado
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Thanks julie!
 
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When buying lettuce seed for possible warm-weather use, look for "Batavia" or "Batavia type" in the description. These hold up much longer without bolting or turning bitter in warm weather. They're somewhat crisp-leaved - sort of like a cross between a butterhead & a romaine - & come in a number of different varieties.

As far as Malabar "spinach", while I've never eaten it, I can say that it makes a very decorative climber. A local herb nursery grows it up & over their arbor entrance & it's quite pretty.

I've found that they still germinate best in cool weather, so if I want to sow some in the summer for succession planting outdoors, I start them indoors in the air conditioning & set them out as seedlings.
 

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"My body is a temple - unfortunately, it's a fixer-upper."

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Thanks guys.

I just read where the perpetual spinach is related to beets and chard, that's interesting.

If malabar is invasive, then that doesn't sound like a good idea. Well, I guess I'm trying some NZ and I'll see how it goes. Smiler
 
============= Love your soil.....feed your worms... (Used to be Sweetpea, contributing here since 2002)
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Hey BioGal!


I too will be trying NZ spinach this summer. We can compare notes!
 
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Mrs. T-bird, Oh good! I have heavy clay and I'm adding granite sand for minerals and flavor. Have you seen the seeds? They are almost medieval!
 
============= Love your soil.....feed your worms... (Used to be Sweetpea, contributing here since 2002)
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