Forums
Search

Candlemaking question

I want to melt down the ends of several candles and make new ones. One of them is weird looking wax from a jar candle. It didn't ever burn levelly (if that's a word) like the others and it looks a bit granular, not smooth. The jar was black around the sides, not sure if this is the wick problem or the bad wax problem. None of the other jar candles did this.

I'm wondering if I mixed this weird wax with quality wax, would it be worth using? Or should I just get rid of it?
 
============= Love your soil.....feed your worms... (Used to be Sweetpea, contributing here since 2002)
Just get rid of it. I used to make a lot of candles. If a wax seemed weird, it usually was. There's nothing more frustrating than having a candle not turn out well because you used something you shouldn't have.
 

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Bloom where you are planted.

Zone 4 Central South Dakota

Like (0 likes)
Hi, Top, thanks for the info. I think I found out that stearin is a cheaper form of paraffin and if it's used in a higher percentage than it should be, the candle will not burn efficiently and will blacken the jar, and create the problem I was seeing.

I partially melted it to get it out of the jar it was in, and when it solidified again there was a lot of white in it, which isn't what the regular wax looks like.

I added a small portion of it to the good wax I had melted and it seems to be fine.

I also ended up making wicks because I couldn't find any locally and didn't have time to send away for any. Yay YouTube!

Now I can see those candles that are on sale are not always a bargain Smiler
 
============= Love your soil.....feed your worms... (Used to be Sweetpea, contributing here since 2002)
Like (0 likes)
Here's a link to several excellent candle-making ideas:
http://chickensintheroad.com/house/archives/candles/
 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Inch by inch, row by row, gonna make this garden grow... David Mallett, "Garden Song"

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Eastern Maine, zone 4

Like (0 likes)
mainebird, thanks for the info. That's a cute site. Smiler
 
============= Love your soil.....feed your worms... (Used to be Sweetpea, contributing here since 2002)
Like (0 likes)
Actually stearin, or stearic acid is an additive that makes normal wax a bit harder. It is a good thing to add to taper type candles, but not something you need in jar candles.
 

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Bloom where you are planted.

Zone 4 Central South Dakota

Like (0 likes)
TopOfTheHill, thanks, that's good to know. So you don't think it would be the grainy looking white stuff that was in the cheap jar candle?
 
============= Love your soil.....feed your worms... (Used to be Sweetpea, contributing here since 2002)
Like (0 likes)
My sister recycles old candles as fire starters for the fireplace by dipping pinecone bottoms into wax and drying on waxed paper. She would give baskets full out over the holidays.
 
Like (0 likes)
how do you clean the wax out of the fileplace and the flu(sp?)
 

»☼Ö®≡Gö∩RΣÐ☺«

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Willemette Valley Oregon, 7A?  Member since 2005

Like (0 likes)
quote:
Originally posted by mainebird:
Here's a link to several excellent candle-making ideas:
http://chickensintheroad.com/house/archives/candles/


Wow nice site. I have been also try to make candles. But I wasn't successful in all of my tries. That's sad. This is a great site indeed with lots of info.
 
Like (0 likes)
LOL..maybe there is a tsp on each pinecone that burns up in the fire. It works really well.
 
Like (0 likes)
When I was a kid my dad always said don't burn the pine cones because they spit sparks and smoke really badly, and he threw one in to show me, and it convinced me not to use them.

We had some elderly neighbors who used their wood stove exclusively for heat. They lived among pine trees and used pine and pine cones in their fires, and they had a big chimney fire that almost took out their house, and filled the house with smoke. Luckily my dad was there to help them put it out. They stopped burning pine altogether.

I've got a woodstove with a glass door and I've watched pitch melt even on old, dry pine, so it's still in there. Even after one season I've had enough buildup happen where I clean out the pipes with one of those puffy scraper things.


I start most of my fires with crumpled up junk paper, used paper towels and napkins lightly packed into the little brown paper lunch bags. Smiler
 
============= Love your soil.....feed your worms... (Used to be Sweetpea, contributing here since 2002)
Like (0 likes)
This is how Wikipedia explains how pine pitch lines the inside of the chimney or stove pipes:

"Burning wood and fossil fuels at low temperature causes incomplete combustion of the oils in the wood, which are off-gassed as volatiles in the smoke. As the smoke rises through the chimney it cools, causing water, carbon, and volatiles to condense on the interior surfaces of the chimney flue. The black oily residue that builds up is referred to as creosote, which is similar in composition to the commercial products by the same name, but with a higher content of carbon black.

Over the course of a season creosote deposits can become several inches thick. This creates a compounding problem, because the creosote deposits reduce the draft (airflow through the chimney) which increases the probability that the wood fire is not getting enough air to burn at high temperature. Since creosote is highly combustible, a thick accumulation creates a fire hazard."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C...te#Wood-tar_creosote
 
============= Love your soil.....feed your worms... (Used to be Sweetpea, contributing here since 2002)
Like (0 likes)
Which is why you clean your fireplace flue and stack if you burn ANY fires in it annually. You are strongly advised NOT to burn pine, period for that reason. But a basket of 10 pine ones over the season? Not a problem.
 
Like (0 likes)
One good, hot fire will melt the build-up, causing it to drip down into the fire and burn safely if your chimney/flu is safely maintained, that is, it has no breaks in the mortar. It is low combustion combined with green wood that causes problems.
 
Like (0 likes)
 
Post Reply
 
 
 


OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image
OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image OGFooter image