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Large Yellow Jacket?

Lately I've had these large yellow jacket looking bees flying around. These things are probably 2-3 inches long & have fat bodies. Their buzz is pretty loud & scary! The strange thing is that they are out at night flying around my outdoor lights. They seem aggressive...almost as if they are trying to "dive bomb" me. Any ideas?
 
Western NC....Zone 7
Yellow jackets are bees, and don't fly at night because bees need the sun so they can tell directions.

Here's a site that talks about low-flying Scollid wasps, most prevalent in August. Or Cicada killer. Does this sound like it?

http://ipm.ncsu.edu/current_ipm/01PestNews/01News14/ornament.html

Here's pictures:

http://www.uky.edu/Ag/CritterFiles/casefile/insects/was...olitary/solitary.htm



Whatever they are, they are most likely responding to the light near you if you are out at night, not you, unless you are threatening their nest.
 
---------------------- Life goes on within you and without you - George Harrison
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FWIW, there are moths that resemble huge wasps....

the 1s here fly during the daytime, tho.
 
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Thanks for the replies & links. None of the pictures matched my "wasp". I see them at night, but they are also out during the day (I guess I should have mentioned that). I'm going see my neighbors this afternoon....maybe they may know what it is.
 
Western NC....Zone 7
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How 'bout a cicada killer wasp? Pretty alarming in size -- but they have a different agenda (per the name). The females create a nest in dirt (in the lawn or in a filled in hole in a stone stair near my garden), hence their inclusion in digger-type bee category.

(Google to get a photo --)

Haven't seen them here in northern NJ this year, though I do hear the cicadas. (Not that I miss the sense of getting divebombed as I tend the garden...)

Deb
 
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I have just spoken with my neighbor & he says they are "Japanese Hornets". I looked this up on the internet & thank God he is wrong. (I hope we never import these like we did the Japanese Beetle!) What I have are European Hornets. I'm enclosing a couple of links that helped me ID this huge Hornet. Thanks for all of your replies! Smiler

http://www.aacutepestcontrol.com/europeanhornets.htm

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/ent/notes/Urban/eurohornet.htm

I hope I pasted these links properly.
 
Western NC....Zone 7
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Wow! Eeker
 
- - - - - - - - - - - - Elizabeth www.WordCures.com
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Have you ever tried a yellow jacket trap, I know they work well, and need cleaned out after the yellow jackets are caught. I use orange juice and three small pieces of fresh meat.
Try this and maybe you will get rid of them.
 
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Yellow Jackets are not Bees, they are Wasps, http://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/HGIC2510.htm
and they do not fly at night. I've not found what you describe, yet.
 

The sign of a good gardener is not a green thumb, it is brown knees.

West central Michigan along the lakeshore.

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Oh Lord in Heaven!!! I've been trying to find out what these hateful things are for a year (since we moved to N. Tenn.) It flabbergasted me that they flew at night. I can't even go out on the deck as they're there and fly inside as soon as I open the door. I read the info on the links and I'm glad, as my husband thought he'd found the nest at the bottom of a lilac bush. Now I know we'll have to keep looking. Those things are MONSTROUS.
 
Claiborne County, TN - Zone 7
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Here's some more info:

http://www.vespa-crabro.de/hornets.htm


http://www.vespa-crabro.de/hornets3.htm
......info from the above link......
If one considers the low mass of hornets prey, such as flies, spiders and wasps, it is clear that this amounts to a tremendous numbers of insects. Hornets catch only living animals of prey, under no circumstances do they forage for carrion. At night hornets catch many nocturnal insects, of which bats are the only other predator.
Hornets are the top predators of the insect world comparable with the birds of prey in the bird world. They are the eagles of the insects. Gardeners should be glad to have a hornet nest nearby!
***

Smiler
Robin
 
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Maybe I should be glad to have them, but I'm not. They're agressive as heck, will attack in a swarm if you get too near their nest, and I just want them far, far away. If you could see that huge stinger you'd know what I mean.
 
Claiborne County, TN - Zone 7
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I have to agree with you Linda. These things are very aggressive! I want them as far away as possible. What makes them even worse is that they are out all day and all night!
 
Western NC....Zone 7
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By the way, Bekah . . . my 14 year old nephew was stung in the eyeball by one of those European hornets last week. Eye swelled shut immediately, then his face started to swell. His mom took him to the ER to have the stinger pulled out . . . I just get chills thinking about it. Nephew wasn't smacking at it or anything, it just flew into his face. They still haven't found a nest.
 
Claiborne County, TN - Zone 7
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That is awful Linda! The way those things fly straight at you, it's easy to see how that could happen. Still haven't found my nest yet either. To be quite honest, I'm almost afraid to find it!
 
Western NC....Zone 7
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I know what you mean. I'm always looking when I'm outside, especially near our woods. I guess if I do find it I'll find out how fast I can still run. My sixteen month old grandson lives with us and he loves nothing better than to be outside and take walks with his papaw. I just shudder to think about those "monster bees" attacking the little guy. I have a can of Raid now, and I keep it in my hand when I open the doors at night.
 
Claiborne County, TN - Zone 7
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Look for those bees inside an old tree. I have found nesting inside of old tree branches. It always seems to be some type of flowering bush.Good Luck

Larry
 
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I have also seen these large yellow jackets around my house. Actually I found four of them in my house. They were all in different localtion. Three of them were in my basement. Do you think I have a nest?
 
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European Hornets aren't known as house nesters. They much prefer the hollows of large old dead or partially dead trees.

They do, however, frequently end up inside houses because, unlike other bees/wasps/hornets, they're attracted to light & do go out foraging at night (as well as daytime).
 

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"My body is a temple - unfortunately, it's a fixer-upper."

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"And no, I'm NOT being snarky."

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Zone 7a, Culpeper, Virginia

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If there's a crack they can squeeze through they will gladly start making a paper nest inside. They got inside my small cabin that they usually make a paper nest under the outside eaves, but a raccoon or something tore it apart from getting on the roof, and they found a small opening where the fascia warped by the roofline.

Mark, go around carefully looking all around the outside of your foundation and basement walls and see if there's a crack or small opening. Usually during the day they will be going in and out rather regularly, so take your time, and if you see two or three in one place then stop and watch where they go. They tend to be solitary when foraging, so my rule is, if there are three anywhere near each other they either have found some food or they are near the opening to the nest. There are also guard bees at the opening, so stay away from it. But you should be able to stand about 6 feet away and watch without them getting upset. If these only go out at night, be careful shining a flashlight on the nest, that might get them upset.

My yellowjackets never live past November, but not sure what kind you've got. A queen can overwinter near where they've found a successful nest in the past. They won't be in exactly the same place, but every three or four years they show up back where they once were.
 
============= Love your soil.....feed your worms... (Used to be Sweetpea, contributing here since 2002)
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A friend rented a cute little cape and in the spring she noticed that there were an awful lot of bees near the deck. They had gotten behind the trim on the door and made a nest inside between the studs and the sheething. They never stung anyone but it sure made them uncomfortable.
I would ck the opening into the basement from the outside as well, cking window wells and trim too.
 
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I live in maryland and have just killed 5 of those things. I am on my deck with the light on at night and these things are huge and do not look anything like the wasp cicada killer, these are no fooling about 1.5-2 inches long and have yellow and black abdomin or thorax ...(body) they look like over sized yellow jackets! what are these things
 
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We have a lot of these European wasps here. While the hummingbird feeders were hanging, they were everywhere. I came across these traps @ harbor freight, while cruising through and checking out all the cheap Chinese crap. I bought 3 sets (2 to a card), I cut them into a big empty plastic pretzel jar with a batch of sugar water/orange soda. Trapped and killed thousands throughout the summer

http://www.harborfreight.com/f...net-traps-94139.html
 
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Are they borer bees?
 
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I would never kill wasps unless they were living inside my house. They are well known predators of insects which they catch and return to their paper nests to feed their larvae. They are some of the "good guys".
 

 Zone 7b  Southeastern PA

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Carpenter Bees? They build galleries in wooden structures. The males of the species are known for dive bombing people who come near the nest, but they don't have stingers, so they're relatively harmless. Check your siding for holes.

I wrote an article about them on my site, but I don't think I have the ability to link from this forum yet. Just Google: GetRidofThings.com Carpenter Bees

The only thing is...I don't think they're nocturnal. Is this late in the night or early evening?
 
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No Jonathan - Carpenter Bees are definitely NOT nocturnal. If you're posting articles about them, I'd sort of think you'd know that.

European Hornets are. One can find these 3" long nasties circling porch lights all the time around here. They're also active during the day, harvesting soft fruits. Lord only knows whether they work in shifts or just never sleep.
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"My body is a temple - unfortunately, it's a fixer-upper."

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"And no, I'm NOT being snarky."

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Zone 7a, Culpeper, Virginia

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...hence my question about the time of day. Bees and wasps of all kinds tend to hover around their nests in the early evening. That's how we find them. European hornets are a fascinating creature, though. I'm enjoying this wikipedia article about them.

Did the OP decide whether to have them removed or not? It seems like having the hornets around might actually be a good thing for their garden.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by brownrexx:
I would never kill wasps unless they were living inside my house. They are well known predators of insects which they catch and return to their paper nests to feed their larvae. They are some of the "good guys".


Brown, never say never. These hornets were so bad near the dog bone bed, my wife couldn't or wouldn't go near it. She had no less than 4 hummingbird feeders there and the nectar attracted thousands from the surrounding forest. I also have a 3 YO niece, who's had her share of complications with allergies, who visits on a weekly basis, one sting would end her up back in the hospital at the least.

The garden is another story, it's 500 feet away from the area the kids play and flower beds. These wasps were never aggressive (like a carpenter bee), just way, way too many.

So many, the hummingbirds even backed off from the feeders. My planned hive location is at the furthest corner of the property, 7-800 feet from the house and common yard, I like bees/wasps too! Smiler
 
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Dude, sorry to be argumentative but it seems that you attracted the wasps by having hummingbird feeders so is it fair to kill them? I don't believe in killing one type of living thing so that I can attract another which pleases me more. In your case I would just figure that hummingbird feeders are not an option for me especially if your niece is a concern. Why risk attracting any wasps?

We have a cabin in the woods of Western PA and I planted lots of beautiful plants which the deer promptly ate. Should I kill the deer or just not have the type of plants that they like? I opted to forget about the plants.
 

 Zone 7b  Southeastern PA

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Frankly, I think "Dude" is misidentifying the wasps in question. The huge European Hornets do not bother with hummingbird feeders. I have both the hornets & the feeders & have never seen the latter bothered by the former. What the European Hornets DO love is ripening fruit - grapes, applies, peaches - you name it. The wasps are so large that I've actually seen them carry off whole grapes. Amazing.

While I don't like them poaching my fruit, I let them be. They have nests in dead trees that I let be in my woodlot specifically for wildlife.
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"My body is a temple - unfortunately, it's a fixer-upper."

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"And no, I'm NOT being snarky."

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Zone 7a, Culpeper, Virginia

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Brown, you are right, I (my wife) attracted them with the feeders. The plan was to attract hummingbirds and there were quite a few. The hummingbirds had nests built in the 2 maples, and were regulars long before the wasps showed up (so was my niece). The plan wasn't to kill over 1000 wasps, they were in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Breezy, I know what a European hornet looks like, maybe you need to change your nectar brand, if you want, I'll find out what the wife uses
 
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I don't use those nectars because at the peak hummer season, I use too much $$. Just a simple syrup in a clear jar with a red plastic base. I keep the solution refrigerated and change it often, moving the location if/when it attracts undesireables..like ants and wasps near my doorway and windows.
My feeders did not attract wasps unless it had fermented (because I forgot to change it) once it ferments the hummers won't come anyway.
 
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Thanks Claude, we'll try that next spring

Brown, My wife and I discussed this thread about the hornet problem over dinner, and agree your reply makes perfect sense. Next season we'll hang the feeders for the hummingbirds, when the Hornets show up, we'll move them to the rear flower garden away from the yard activites. She already has quite a few perennials planted in the dogbone bed and plans to plant a lot more varieties to naturally draw in the hummers. Thanks for helping us see it your way Wink

Here's a pic of the dogbone bed, early on, hopefully I sized it right this time, the rear flower garden is in the back to the left a few hundred feet away
 
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Having done a little research, since your reply "breezy" trying to figure out what makes these hornets tick, I found a few interesting articles. They really do a number on insects, mostly to feed their young back at the nest, but they (the adults) prefer to feed on sap and nectar. I didn't dig very deep, but I didn't see anything about fruit, but you are probably right. "I think"

http://ideastations.org/sciencematters?page=1
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Some dude in jersey:
Thanks Claude, we'll try that next spring

Brown, My wife and I discussed this thread about the hornet problem over dinner, and agree your reply makes perfect sense. Next season we'll hang the feeders for the hummingbirds, when the Hornets show up, we'll move them to the rear flower garden away from the yard activites. She already has quite a few perennials planted in the dogbone bed and plans to plant a lot more varieties to naturally draw in the hummers. Thanks for helping us see it your way Wink

Here's a pic of the dogbone bed, early on, hopefully I sized it right this time, the rear flower garden is in the back to the left a few hundred feet away


Dude, I am so happy to hear that. I really believe in live and let live even with insects unless they are non native invasive species like Japanese Beetles or Stinkbugs. After thinking about this thread I Googled "hummingbird feeders and bees" and apparently there are some solutions for this problem like bee guards or special shaped feeders. The hummingbirds have very long tongues and the bees don't so the bee guards will prevent the bees from reaching the nectar. I have never tried these myself since I don't have a bee problem. Relocating your feeders sounds like a good solution as well.

I would like to see the dogbone bed but no picture was attached.
 

 Zone 7b  Southeastern PA

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My Aunt used to have picnics for the family every summer and the bees and flies are sometimes a pia. Her solution was to early in the morning of, take a ripe watermelon, cut a very large chunk, rind and all and leave it in a plastic dish AWAY from the picnic area. It managed to keep the bees and flies happy and away from the guests.
 
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An EXCELLENT non lethal solution. I love that kind of stuff!
 

 Zone 7b  Southeastern PA

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i live in rockville maryland, minutes from the nations capitol. in the past two weeks I have found two giant asian hornets in MY HOUSE. I crushed the former and have it... it is an exact match to the photograph of same. I live in a regular neighborhood and am concerned more are around. what do i look for? how do i get rid of them if i do find a nest?
 
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